Shape Modeling International (SMI 2016) Introduces Reproducibility Award

This year, also SMI will introduce an Award for Reproducibility to be granted to authors of accepted papers who are willing to provide a complete open-source implementation of their algorithm. The reproducibility stamp does not affect the reviewing process or the requirements for your submission to be accepted. The awarded papers will receive an additional 5 to 10 minutes in their presentation to give a live demo and will be recognized during the SMI closing ceremony. More information on the web site soon.

A Bayesian Perspective on the Reproducibility Project: Psychology

We revisit the results of the recent Reproducibility Project: Psychology by the Open Science Collaboration. We compute Bayes factors—a quantity that can be used to express comparative evidence for an hypothesis but also for the null hypothesis—for a large subset (N = 72) of the original papers and their corresponding replication attempts.

A Practical Guide for Improving transparency and Reproducibility in Neuroimaging Research

Recent years have seen an increase in alarming signals about the lack of replicability in neuroscience, psychology, and other related fields. To avoid a widespread crisis in our field and consequent loss of credibility in the public eye, we need to improve how we do science. This article aims to be a practical guide for researchers at any stage of their careers that will help them make their research more reproducible and transparent while minimizing the additional effort that this might require. The guide covers three major topics in open science (data, code, and publications) and offers practical advice as well as highlighting advantages of adopting more open research practices that go beyond improved transparency and reproducibility.

BioPolicy Summit tackles reproducibility of science issues

The 2016 GBSI Summit—"Research Reproducibility: Innovative Solutions to Drive Quality" welcomed premiere life science thought leaders, including Arizona State University biomarker researcher Joshua LaBaer, MD, PhD, and science correspondent and moderator Richard Harris (currently on leave from National Public Radio as a visiting scholar this spring at Arizona State University), to explore the driving forces and profound impacts behind the issues.

ReproZip Featured on Library of Congress Blog Post

ReproZip was featured in a post on the Library of Congress's digital preservation blog, the Signal. The author, Genevieve Havemeyer-King, writes "ReproZip is a tool being developed at NYU "aimed at simplifying the process of creating reproducible experiments from command-line executions", and could be something to consider as an alternative to many costly web-archiving services for preservation of internet-based projects and applications."