In a recent Opinion article, Parker et al. [1] highlight a range of important issues and provide tangible solutions to improve transparency in ecology and evolution (E&E). We agree wholeheartedly with their points and encourage the E&E community to heed their advice. However, a key issue remains conspicuously unaddressed: Parker et al. assume that ‘deliberate dishonesty’ is rare in E&E, yet evidence suggests that occurrences of scientific misconduct (i.e., data fabrication, falsification, and/or plagiarism) are disturbingly common in the life sciences [2].