Posts about reproducible paper (old posts, page 9)

The Reproducibility Of Research And The Misinterpretation Of P Values

We wish to answer this question: If you observe a "significant" P value after doing a single unbiased experiment, what is the probability that your result is a false positive? The weak evidence provided by P values between 0.01 and 0.05 is explored by exact calculations of false positive rates. When you observe P = 0.05, the odds in favour of there being a real effect (given by the likelihood ratio) are about 3:1. This is far weaker evidence than the odds of 19 to 1 that might, wrongly, be inferred from the P value. And if you want to limit the false positive rate to 5%, you would have to assume that you were 87% sure that there was a real effect before the experiment was done. If you observe P = 0.001 in a well-powered experiment, it gives a likelihood ratio of almost 100:1 odds on there being a real effect. That would usually be regarded as conclusive, But the false positive rate would still be 8% if the prior probability of a real effect was only 0.1. And, in this case, if you wanted to achieve a false positive rate of 5% you would need to observe P = 0.00045. It is recommended that P values should be supplemented by specifying the prior probability that would be needed to produce a specified (e.g. 5%) false positive rate. It may also be helpful to specify the minimum false positive rate associated with the observed P value. And that the terms "significant" and "non-significant" should never be used. Despite decades of warnings, many areas of science still insist on labelling a result of P < 0.05 as "significant". This practice must account for a substantial part of the lack of reproducibility in some areas of science. And this is before you get to the many other well-known problems, like multiple comparisons, lack of randomisation and P-hacking. Science is endangered by statistical misunderstanding, and by university presidents and research funders who impose perverse incentives on scientists.

Reproducibility in Machine Learning-Based Studies: An Example of Text Mining

Reproducibility is an essential requirement for computational studies including those based on machine learning techniques. However, many machine learning studies are either not reproducible or are difficult to reproduce. In this paper, we consider what information about text mining studies is crucial to successful reproduction of such studies. We identify a set of factors that affect reproducibility based on our experience of attempting to reproduce six studies proposing text mining techniques for the automation of the citation screening stage in the systematic review process. Subsequently, the reproducibility of 30 studies was evaluated based on the presence or otherwise of information relating to the factors. While the studies provide useful reports of their results, they lack information on access to the dataset in the form and order as used in the original study (as against raw data), the software environment used, randomization control and the implementation of proposed techniques. In order to increase the chances of being reproduced, researchers should ensure that details about and/or access to information about these factors are provided in their reports.

trackr: A Framework for Enhancing Discoverability and Reproducibility of Data Visualizations and Other Artifacts in R

Research is an incremental, iterative process, with new results relying and building upon previous ones. Scientists need to find, retrieve, understand, and verify results in order to confidently extend them, even when the results are their own. We present the trackr framework for organizing, automatically annotating, discovering, and retrieving results. We identify sources of automatically extractable metadata for computational results, and we define an extensible system for organizing, annotating, and searching for results based on these and other metadata. We present an opensource implementation of these concepts for plots, computational artifacts, and woven dynamic reports generated in the R statistical computing language.

Progress toward openness, transparency, and reproducibility in cognitive neuroscience

Accumulating evidence suggests that many findings in psychological science and cognitive neuroscience may prove difficult to reproduce; statistical power in brain imaging studies is low, and has not improved recently; software errors in common analysis tools are common, and can go undetected for many years; and, a few large scale studies notwithstanding, open sharing of data, code, and materials remains the rare exception. At the same time, there is a renewed focus on reproducibility, transparency, and openness as essential core values in cognitive neuroscience. The emergence and rapid growth of data archives, meta-analytic tools, software pipelines, and research groups devoted to improved methodology reflects this new sensibility. We review evidence that the field has begun to embrace new open research practices, and illustrate how these can begin to address problems of reproducibility, statistical power, and transparency in ways that will ultimately accelerate discovery.

Repeat: A Framework to Assess Empirical Reproducibility in Biomedical Research

Background: The reproducibility of research is essential to rigorous science, yet significant concerns of the reliability and verifiability of biomedical research have been recently highlighted. Ongoing efforts across several domains of science and policy are working to clarify the fundamental characteristics of reproducibility and to enhance the transparency and accessibility of research. Methods: The aim of the proceeding work is to develop an assessment tool operationalizing key concepts of research transparency in the biomedical domain, specifically for secondary biomedical data research using electronic health record data. The tool (RepeAT) was developed through a multi-phase process that involved coding and extracting recommendations and practices for improving reproducibility from publications and reports across the biomedical and statistical sciences, field testing the instrument, and refining variables. Results: RepeAT includes 103 unique variables grouped into five categories (research design and aim, database and data collection methods, data mining and data cleaning, data analysis, data sharing and documentation). Preliminary results in manually processing 40 scientific manuscripts indicate components of the proposed framework with strong inter-rater reliability, as well as directions for further research and refinement of RepeAT. Conclusions: The use of RepeAT may allow the biomedical community to have a better understanding of the current practices of research transparency and accessibility among principal investigators. Common adoption of RepeAT may improve reporting of research practices and the availability of research outputs. Additionally, use of RepeAT will facilitate comparisons of research transparency and accessibility across domains and institutions.

Video can make science more open, transparent, robust, and reproducible

Amidst the recent flood of concerns about transparency and reproducibility in the behavioral and clinical sciences, we suggest a simple, inexpensive, easy-to-implement, and uniquely powerful tool to improve the reproducibility of scientific research and accelerate progress—video recordings of experimental procedures. Widespread use of video for documenting procedures could make moot disagreements about whether empirical replications truly reproduced the original experimental conditions. We call on researchers, funders, and journals to make commonplace the collection and open sharing of video-recorded procedures.