Posts about reproducible paper (old posts, page 20)

Where next for the reproducibility agenda in computational biology?

The concept of reproducibility is a foundation of the scientific method. With the arrival of fast and powerful computers over the last few decades, there has been an explosion of results based on complex computational analyses and simulations. The reproducibility of these results has been addressed mainly in terms of exact replicability or numerical equivalence, ignoring the wider issue of the reproducibility of conclusions through equivalent, extended or alternative methods.

samExploreR: Exploring reproducibility and robustness of RNA-seq results based on SAM files

Data from RNA-seq experiments provide us with many new possibilities to gain insights into biological and disease mechanisms of cellular functioning. However, the reproducibility and robustness of RNA-seq data analysis results is often unclear. This is in part attributed to the two counter acting goals of (a) a cost efficient and (b) an optimal experimental design leading to a compromise, e.g., in the sequencing depth of experiments.

Show and tell: disclosure and data sharing in experimental pathology

Reproducibility of data from experimental investigations using animal models is increasingly under scrutiny because of the potentially negative impact of poor reproducibility on the translation of basic research. Histopathology is a key tool in biomedical research, in particular for the phenotyping of animal models to provide insights into the pathobiology of diseases. Failure to disclose and share crucial histopathological experimental details compromises the validity of the review process and reliability of the conclusions. We discuss factors that affect the interpretation and validation of histopathology data in publications and the importance of making these data accessible to promote replicability in research.

Repeatability, Reproducibility, Separative Power and Subjectivity of Different Fish Morphometric Analysis Methods

We compared the repeatability, reproducibility (intra- and inter-measurer similarity), separative power and subjectivity (measurer effect on results) of four morphometric methods frequently used in ichthyological research, the “traditional” caliper-based (TRA) and truss-network (TRU) distance methods and two geometric methods that compare landmark coordinates on the body (GMB) and scales (GMS).