Posts about reproducible paper (old posts, page 18)

Reproducibility and transparency in biomedical sciences

The biomedical research sciences are currently facing a challenge highlighted in several recent publications: concerns about the rigor and reproducibility of studies published in the scientific literature.Research progress is strongly dependent on published work. Basic science researchers build on their own prior work and the published findings of other researchers. This work becomes the foundation for preclinical and clinical research aimed at developing innovative new diagnostic tools and disease therapies. At each of the stages of research, scientific rigor and reproducibility are critical, and the financial and ethical stakes rise as drug development research moves through these stages.

Most computational hydrology is not reproducible, so is it really science?

Reproducibility is a foundational principle in scientific research. Yet in computational hydrology, the code and data that actually produces published results is not regularly made available, inhibiting the ability of the community to reproduce and verify previous findings. In order to overcome this problem we recommend that re-useable code and formal workflows, which unambiguously reproduce published scientific results, are made available for the community alongside data, so that we can verify previous findings, and build directly from previous work. In cases where reproducing large-scale hydrologic studies is computationally very expensive and time-consuming, new processes are required to ensure scientific rigour. Such changes will strongly improve the transparency of hydrological research, and thus provide a more credible foundation for scientific advancement and policy support.

Scientific Misconduct: The Elephant in the Lab. A Response to Parker et al.

In a recent Opinion article, Parker et al. [1] highlight a range of important issues and provide tangible solutions to improve transparency in ecology and evolution (E&E). We agree wholeheartedly with their points and encourage the E&E community to heed their advice. However, a key issue remains conspicuously unaddressed: Parker et al. assume that ‘deliberate dishonesty’ is rare in E&E, yet evidence suggests that occurrences of scientific misconduct (i.e., data fabrication, falsification, and/or plagiarism) are disturbingly common in the life sciences [2].

Reproducibility and replicability of rodent phenotyping in preclinical studies

The scientific community is increasingly concerned with cases of published "discoveries" that are not replicated in further studies. The field of mouse phenotyping was one of the first to raise this concern, and to relate it to other complicated methodological issues: the complex interaction between genotype and environment; the definitions of behavioral constructs; and the use of the mouse as a model animal for human health and disease mechanisms. In January 2015, researchers from various disciplines including genetics, behavior genetics, neuroscience, ethology, statistics and bioinformatics gathered in Tel Aviv University to discuss these issues. The general consent presented here was that the issue is prevalent and of concern, and should be addressed at the statistical, methodological and policy levels, but is not so severe as to call into question the validity and the usefulness of the field as a whole. Well-organized community efforts, coupled with improved data and metadata sharing were agreed by all to have a key role to play in view of identifying specific problems, as well as promoting effective solutions. As replicability is related to validity and may also affect generalizability and translation of findings, the implications of the present discussion reach far beyond the issue of replicability of mouse phenotypes but may be highly relevant throughout biomedical research.

The Solution to Science's Replication Crisis

The solution to science's replication crisis is a new ecosystem in which scientists sell what they learn from their research. In each pairwise transaction, the information seller makes (loses) money if he turns out to be correct (incorrect). Responsibility for the determination of correctness is delegated, with appropriate incentives, to the information purchaser. Each transaction is brokered by a central exchange, which holds money from the anonymous information buyer and anonymous information seller in escrow, and which enforces a set of incentives facilitating the transfer of useful, bluntly honest information from the seller to the buyer. This new ecosystem, capitalist science, directly addresses socialist science's replication crisis by explicitly rewarding accuracy and penalizing inaccuracy.

Reproducibility in wireless experimentation: need, challenges, and approaches

Wireless networks are the key enabling technology of the mobile revolution. However, experimental mobile and wireless research is still hindered by the lack of a solid framework to adequately evaluate the performance of a wide variety of techniques and protocols proposed by the community. In this talk, I will motivate the need for experimental reproducibility as a necessary aspect for healthy progress as accepted by other communities. I will illustrate how other research communities went through similar processes. I will then present the unique challenges of mobile and wireless experimentation, and discuss approaches, past, current, and future to address these challenges. Finally, I will discuss how reproducibility extends to mobile and wireless security research.