Posts about reproducibility infrastructure (old posts, page 1)

Dugong: a Docker image, based on Ubuntu Linux, focused on reproducibility and replicability for bioinformatics analyses

Summary: This manuscript introduces and describes Dugong, a Docker image based on Ubuntu 16.04, which automates installation of more than 3500 bioinformatics tools (along with their respective libraries and dependencies), in alternative computational environments. The software operates through a user-friendly XFCE4 graphic interface that allows software management and installation by users not fully familiarized with the Linux command line and provides the Jupyter Notebook to assist in the delivery and exchange of consistent and reproducible protocols and results across laboratories, assisting in the development of open science projects.

Reproducible Data Analysis in Jupyter

Jupyter notebooks provide a useful environment for interactive exploration of data. A common question I get, though, is how you can progress from this nonlinear, interactive, trial-and-error style of exploration to a more linear and reproducible analysis based on organized, packaged, and tested code. This series of videos presents a case study in how I personally approach reproducible data analysis within the Jupyter notebook.

Using the Nextflow framework for reproducible in-silico omics analyses across clusters and clouds

Reproducibility has become one of biology’s most pressing issues. This impasse has been fueled by the combined reliance on increasingly complex data analysis methods and the exponential growth of biological datasets. When considering the installation, deployment and maintenance of bioinformatic pipelines, an even more challenging picture emerges due to the lack of community standards. The effect of limited standards on reproducibility is amplified by the very diverse range of computational platforms and configurations on which these applications are expected to be applied (workstations, clusters, HPC, clouds, etc.). With no established standard at any level, diversity cannot be taken for granted.

Video: Singularity – Containers for Science, Reproducibility, and HPC

Explore how Singularity liberates non-privileged users and host resources (such as interconnects, resource managers, file systems, accelerators …) allowing users to take full control to set-up and run in their native environments. This talk explores Singularity how it combines software packaging models with minimalistic containers to create very lightweight application bundles which can be simply executed and contained completely within their environment or be used to interact directly with the host file systems at native speeds. A Singularity application bundle can be as simple as containing a single binary application or as complicated as containing an entire workflow and is as flexible as you will need.

Linux Foundation Back Reproducible Builds Effort for Secure Software

In an effort to help open-source software developers build more secure software, the Linux Foundation is doubling down on its efforts to help the reproducible builds project. Among the most basic and often most difficult aspects of software development is making sure that the software end-users get is the same software that developers actually built. "Reproducible builds are a set of software development practices that create a verifiable path from human readable source code to the binary code used by computers," the Reproducible Builds project explains.

Capturing the "Whole Tale" of Computational Research: Reproducibility in Computing Environments

We present an overview of the recently funded "Merging Science and Cyberinfrastructure Pathways: The Whole Tale" project (NSF award #1541450). Our approach has two nested goals: 1) deliver an environment that enables researchers to create a complete narrative of the research process including exposure of the data-to-publication lifecycle, and 2) systematically and persistently link research publications to their associated digital scholarly objects such as the data, code, and workflows. To enable this, WholeTale will create an environment where researchers can collaborate on data, workspaces, and workflows and then publish them for future adoption or modification. Published data and applications will be consumed either directly by users using the Whole Tale environment or can be integrated into existing or future domain Science Gateways.