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Data Science Environments partners publish reproducibility book

Researchers from the UW’s eScience Institute, New York University Center for Data Science and Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS) have authored a new book titled The Practice of Reproducible Research. Representatives from the three universities, all Moore-Sloan Data Science Environments partners, joined on January 27, 2017, at a symposium hosted by BIDS. There, speakers discussed the book’s content, including case studies, lessons learned and the potential future of reproducible research practices.

JoVE Builds on Ten Years of Making Science Clearer, More Reproducible

JoVE, the leading creator and publisher of video solutions that increase productivity in scientific research and education, today announced 2017 plans to mark the Company’s 10th anniversary. This year-long initiative will include the introduction of new Engineering and the Physical Sciences Collections within JoVE Science Education. JoVE will launch ten major initiatives, including a new JoVE Unlimited pricing formula, enhanced web experience, and establish a number of grants to advance scientific research and education.

Cancer reproducibility project releases first results

The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology launched in 2013 as an ambitious effort to scrutinize key findings in 50 cancer papers published in Nature, Science, Cell and other high-impact journals. It aims to determine what fraction of influential cancer biology studies are probably sound — a pressing question for the field. In 2012, researchers at the biotechnology firm Amgen in Thousand Oaks, California, announced that they had failed to replicate 47 of 53 landmark cancer papers2. That was widely reported, but Amgen has not identified the studies involved.

Scientific papers need better feedback systems. Here's why

Somewhere between 65 and 90 per cent of biomedical literature is considered non-reproducible. This means that if you try to reproduce an experiment described in a given paper, 65 to 90 per cent of the time you won't get the same findings. We call this the reproducibility crisis. The issue became live thanks to a study by Glenn Begley, who ran the oncology department at Amgen, a pharmaceutical company. In 2011, Begley decided to try to reproduce findings in 53 foundational papers in oncology: highly cited papers published in the top journals. He was unable to reproduce 47 of them - 89 per cent.

Enabling access to reproducible research

A team of Web and Internet Science (WAIS) researchers, from Electronics and Computer Science at Southampton, has been working with statistical colleagues at the Centre for Multilevel Modelling, University of Bristol, to develop new software technology that allows UK students and young researchers to access reproducible statistical research.