Posts about news article (old posts, page 13)

Massive Study Reports Challenges in Reproducing Published Psychology Findings

A study that sought to replicate 100 findings published in three prominent psychology journals has found that, across multiple criteria, independent researchers could replicate less than half of the original findings. In some cases this may call into question the validity of some scientific findings, but it may also point to the difficulty of conducting effective replications and achieving reproducible results.

Program Seeks to Nurture 'Data Science Culture' at Universities

In collaboration with the University of Washington (UW) and Berkeley, and under the sponsorship of the Moore and Sloan foundations, NYU is working on a new initiative to 'harness the potential of data scientists and big data'. As part of this initiative, we aim to increase awareness of sharing, preservation, provenance, and reproducibility best practices across UW, NYU, Berkeley campuses and encourage their adoption.

Junk science? Most preclinical cancer studies don't replicate

When a cancer study is published in a prestigious peer-reviewed journal, the implication is the findings are robust, replicable, and point the way toward eventual treatments. Consequently, researchers scour their colleagues' work for clues about promising avenues to explore. Doctors pore over the pages, dreaming of new therapies coming down the pike. Which makes a new finding that nine out of 10 preclinical peer-reviewed cancer research studies cannot be replicated all the more shocking and discouraging.

How Bright Promise in Cancer Testing Fell Apart

Research at Duke University in genomics that involved fighting cancer by looking for gene patterns that would determine which drugs would best attack a particular cancer (no more trial-and-error treatment, considered a breakthrough). This research turned out to be wrong, due to flaws in the research (found by statisticians); if the research was reproducible, errors could have been found earlier and the patients could have continued their treatment.

It’s Science, but Not Necessarily Right

NY article discussing the issues with scientific reproducibility: "Why? One simple answer is that it takes a lot of time to look back over other scientists’ work and replicate their experiments. Scientists are busy people, scrambling to get grants and tenure. As a result, papers that attract harsh criticism may nonetheless escape the careful scrutiny required if they are to be refuted."